Refreshing Bean Salad Recipe

I just love the Food.com app. It’s surely the best free app ever invented.

This kidney bean recipe meets my easy-to-prepare/nutritious/tasty criteria. I made it recently and it was well received by all.

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If you don’t like kidney beans try red beans, garbanzo beans or even black beans. You really can’t go wrong.

Enjoy!

http://www.food.com/recipe/colorful-kidney-bean-salad-130017?photo=20542

 

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The I Love My Muscles Pro-Life Post (let’s try this again now that I am back in reliable WiFi territory)

The gift of life is a most statistically, unlikely event. The chances of you being here at all are about 1 in 400 trillion. Seriously, the odds of you being born make winning the Powerball look like a sure thing.

Isn’t is sad that we often take for granted, or much worse, abuse the opportunity?

If we acknowledge that life is a privilege, shouldn’t we made it a priority to maintain a basic level of fitness and healthful nutrition? Doing what you can to be healthy isn’t a hassle when you realize that it positions you to live with greater energy, entrance, confidence and purpose.

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Pretty Please With Extra Sugar On It

We are born craving sugar. (think mothers milk).

Sugars and starches are easily converted to energy in your body; essential energy needed to fuel your organs and muscles.

Sugar is not evil. It’s what we do to it and how much of it we eat that’s possibly less than healthful:

***Sugar combined with fat, salt and/or sugar is pretty much irresistible. Chips, pretzels, crackers,doughnut, cookies, cakes, etc …Yum!

***’Natural’ sugars and starches such as those in potatoes and sweet fruits are a much better alternative with one big caveat: There’s nothing natural about the amount of sugar contained in an apple the size of your head. Or grapes the size of golf balls.

Carbs are good. Eat fruit. Drink wine. Enjoy your chips and cookies.

AND be aware of how YOUR body responds to sugar…monitor your cravings and energy and decide if you need to make adjustments in your overall nutrition.

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Keeping It Real

In my never-humble opinion, our culture has elevated fitness, certain eating plans and low body-fat composition to a level of virtuousness beyond absurdity.

Whether or not a person chooses to pursue health and fitness has nothing to do with their innate virtue, goodness or worth. Obviously, maintaining a healthy body makes life a lot easier — who wouldn’t benefit from increased stamina, strength and endurance?

But you surely don’t need to feel guilty or ashamed if you choose not to exercise. People who make emotional decisions (especially decisions based on negative emotion) rarely remain focused or intentional. When you remove emotions from the decision of whether or not to pursue fitness and health, you are freed from guilt-driven motivations and open to becoming healthy for rational, reasoned motivations.

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Constructive Rest

Why is it that we have to wait for Officially Sanctioned Vacation Time until we give ourselves permission to walk in the rain with our dog, read for hours on a shady deck, stay up way too late playing silly games with our kids, sit around a campfire enjoying pointless conversation, take a nice long (non-workout) bike ride or allow ourselves the creative joy that comes with writing a post for a long-neglected blog?

In yoga, we call this Constructive Rest. Doesn’t that have a nice connotation? Almost as if it’s an extremely vital, beneficial undertaking that probably shouldn’t wait until the 2 or 3 times a year that we allow ourselves to relax?

While most of us don’t have the luxury of (or interest in) wandering the woods for hours or sitting calmly contemplating the wonders of the universe, maybe we could find a few minutes each (non-sanctioned vacation) day to sit back and enjoy a few minutes of being grateful, content and wishing the best for all humanity.

A little, daily constructive rest will go a long way toward creating peace and harmony throughout the rest of your day.

Namaste, my friends.image